Study: Naturopaths and homeopaths refer to themselves as "doctor" more than doctors

Study: Naturopaths and homeopaths refer to themselves as "doctor" more than doctors

NEW YORK, NY – A recent study by Columbia University has revealed that naturopaths and homeopaths refer to themselves as “doctor” far more often that their MD (real doctors) counterparts do.

“We looked at social media, advertising and social interactions among the three groups” explained principal investigator David Bayyer, PhD. “We found that naturopaths and homeopaths were nearly 4 times more likely to refer to themselves as ‘doctor’.”

The study examined social media (Facebook and Twitter) and found a shockingly high number of pseudo-doctors refer to themselves numerous times as doctor.

“A lot of them had it in their Facebook name and bio. On Twitter, we saw a huge number using the term “Doctor” or “Dr.” in their Twitter handle, username and biography.”

The researchers also used hidden microphones at numerous dinner parties attended by the three groups and found that on average, naturopaths and homeopaths averaged just under 4 seconds of conversation before mentioning they were “doctors”. Many of the medical doctor group did not mention it at all.

The researchers next plan on looking at women who had homebirths.

 

  • JOSHUA DIAZFRANCO

    There is a Doctoral degree in Naturopathic Sciences, PhD. Homeopathic practice is a resource from Naturopathic Medicine. You’re really out your knowledge.

    • Chris

      So what? It is just a bunch of nonsense. Anyone who passed high school chemistry would know that homeopathy is just two hundred year old sympathetic magic (“like cures like”).

      And anyone could make their own homeopathic meds without paying a substantial markup for sugar pills that are very much like those used to decorate Christmas cookies:

      Recipe for Nat Mur or Natrum Mur or Natrium Mur or Natrum muriaticum:

      1) Take ½ teaspoon of sea salt and dissolve into 1 cup of distilled water in a bottle.

      2) Shake well.

      3) This is a 1C solution (ratio 1/100).

      4) Take ½ teaspoon of the 1C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 1C solution.

      5) Shake well.

      6) This is a 2C solution (ratio 1/10000).

      7) Take ½ teaspoon of the 2C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 2C solution.

      8) Shake well.

      9) This is a 3C solution (ratio 1/1000000).

      10) Take ½ teaspoon of the 3C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 3C solution.

      11) Shake well.

      12) This is a 4C solution (ratio 1/100000000).

      13) Take ½ teaspoon of the 4C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 4C solution.

      14) Shake well.

      15) This is a 5C solution (ratio 1/10000000000).

      16) Take ½ teaspoon of the 5C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 5C solution.

      17) Shake well.

      18) This is a 6C solution (ratio 1/1000000000000).

      19) Take ½ teaspoon of the 6C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 6C solution.

      20) Shake well.

      21) This is a 7C solution (ratio 1/100000000000000).

      22) Take ½ teaspoon of the 7C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 7C solution.

      23) Shake well.

      24) This is an 8C solution (ratio 1/10000000000000000).

      25) Take ½ teaspoon of the 8C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 8C solution.

      26) Shake well.

      27) This is a 9C solution (ratio 1/1000000000000000000).

      28) Take ½ teaspoon of the 9C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 9C solution.

      29) Shake well.

      30) This is a 10C solution (ratio 1/100000000000000000000).

      31) Take ½ teaspoon of the 10C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 10C solution.

      32) Shake well.

      33) This is a 11C solution (ratio 1/10000000000000000000000).

      34) Take ½ teaspoon of the 11C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 11C solution.

      35) Shake well.

      36) This is a 12C solution (ratio 1/1000000000000000000000000).

      37) Take ½ teaspoon of the 12C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 12C solution.

      38) Shake well.

      39) This is a 13C solution (ratio 1/100000000000000000000000000).

      40) Take ½ teaspoon of the 13C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 13C solution.

      41) Shake well.

      42) This is a 14C solution (ratio 1/10000000000000000000000000000).

      43) Take ½ teaspoon of the 14C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 14C solution.

      44) Shake well.

      45) This is a 15C solution (ratio 1/1000000000000000000000000000000).

      46) Take ½ teaspoon of the 15C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 15C solution.

      47) Shake well.

      48) This is a 16C solution (ratio 1/100000000000000000000000000000000).

      49) Take ½ teaspoon of the 16C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 16C solution.

      50) Shake well.

      51) This is a 17C solution (ratio 1/10000000000000000000000000000000000).

      52) Take ½ teaspoon of the 17C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 17C solution.

      53) Shake well.

      54) This is an 18C solution (ratio 1/1000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      55) Take ½ teaspoon of the 18C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 18C solution.

      56) Shake well.

      57) This is a 19C solution (ratio 1/100000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      58) Take ½ teaspoon of the 19C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 19C solution.

      59) Shake well.

      60) This is a 20C solution (ratio 1/10000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      61) Take ½ teaspoon of the 20C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 20C solution.

      62) Shake well.

      63) This is a 21C solution (ratio 1 in 10^42 or 1/1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      64) Take ½ teaspoon of the 21C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 21C solution.

      65) Shake well.

      66) This is a 22C solution (ratio 1 in 10^44 or 1/100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      67) Take ½ teaspoon of the 22C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 22C solution.

      68) Shake well.

      69) This is a 23C solution (ratio 1 in 10^46 or 1/10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      70) Take ½ teaspoon of the 23C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 23C solution.

      71) Shake well.

      72) This is a 24C solution (ratio 1 in 10^48 or 1/1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      73) Take ½ teaspoon of the 24C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 24C solution.

      74) Shake well.

      75) This is a 25C solution (ratio 1 in 10^50 or 1/100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      76) Take ½ teaspoon of the 25C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 25C solution.

      77) Shake well.

      78) This is a 26C solution (ratio 1 in 10^52 or 1/10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      79) Take ½ teaspoon of the 26C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 26C solution.

      80) Shake well.

      81) This is a 27C solution (ratio 1 in 10^54 or 1/1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).
      (the zeros are running off of the page!)

      82) Take ½ teaspoon of the 27C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 27C solution.

      83) Shake well.

      84) This is a 28C solution (ratio 1 in 10^56 or 1/100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      85) Take ½ teaspoon of the 28C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 28C solution.

      86) Shake well.

      87) This is a 29C solution (ratio 1 in 10^58 or 1/10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      88) Take ½ teaspoon of the 29C solution and put it a bottle with 1 cup of distilled water, throw out the 29C solution.

      89) Shake well.

      90) This is a 30C solution (ratio 1 in 10^60 or 1/1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000).

      And then you are done! To make the pills, go to baking center of your grocery store and get some plain cake decorating sprinkles. You can try dropping some of the solution on the sprinkles, or just set the bottle next to the solution for it to absorb the energy (which is the typical method used for over the counter homeopathic remedies).

      You can make up other remedies by knowing what the mother tincture is… For instance “Nux Vomica” (or Nux Vom) is from the Nux Vomica plant which contains the poison strychnine, Nux Sulph uses sulpher, and the stuff advertised on the radio for colds, Oscillococcinum is from duck bits.

      • Dr Manhattan

        So where is your proof that the Laws of Thermodynamics do not apply to homeopathic dilutions?

        Are you also aware that not only can homeopathic dilutions can be tested and identified by the original substance, they can also identify different potencies?

        • Chris

          “So where is your proof that the Laws of Thermodynamics do not apply to homeopathic dilutions?”

          Where did I mention they did not apply? Also, that is not the chemical concept I was invoking. Though the colloquial version of the first law does apply: you can’t get something from nothing.

          “Are you also aware that not only can homeopathic dilutions can be tested and identified by the original substance, they can also identify
          different potencies?”

          Prove it. Citation needed. Also explain why no one claimed the cash when that was part of the James Randi Challenge, that is no over after over thirty years without any one even attempting to prove homeopathy works.

          Though that is not the only silly claim I have seen about homeopathy. Andre Saine claims that homeopathy works better for rabies than modern medicine. He has never given any proof. But you can! Just post the less than fifty years old PubMed indexed animal study by non-homeopaths showing homeopathy worked better on infected rodents than the modern vaccine (which was introduced in the 1960s). Until that evidence is given the only really thing homeopathy has been proven to help is with a self-limiting condition like a cold, where the sugar pills are nice for sweetening some hot tea.

          • Dr Manhattan

            You imply it in your rant about the preparations of homeopathic dilutions.

            The research was published 10 years ago, and is mention in the same debate you linked to me in another reply with Steven Novella and Rustom Roy, LMAO.

            Randi’s Challenge is a hoax, people have tried to claim it, Randi keeps changing the goal posts so that no one can win the million dollars. Why does he never let a homeopath pick a remedy for him to overdose on, and instead tries to overdose on innocuous sleeping aids?

            There are modern recorded cases of people who were infected by rabies who were cured by homeopathy

          • Chris

            So prove Andre Saine’s contention. Just provide the PubMed animal study by a non-homeopath that shows homeopathy worked better than the 1960s modern vaccine in rodents. Please no more excuses, even in the debate I linked to supporters wondered why there had been no animal study.

            Those case reports are by homeopaths in places like India or Pakistan, so are not actually very reliable:
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=12974558

          • Dr Manhattan

            Ask the CDC why no such study has been funded. Could it be because the rabies vaccine industry generated $12 billion in revenues and is forecasted to hit $20 billion by 2021.

            When they do a cardiac study, do they employ non cardiac doctors to eliminate bias? No they don’t, they have peer review for that purpose.

          • Chris

            You made a claim, so you need to provide the actual verifiable evidence, which has been defined for you. But you have nothing. How very homeopathic.

            By the way, most homeopathy is done outside of the USA. The CDC has no jurisdiction in India, Pakistan, France, Germany and pretty much most of this planet.

          • Windriven

            Dr. Asshattan doesn’t provide citations and s/he certainly doesn’t provide proof. Save your breath.

          • Chris

            My comments are not really for him, but for lurkers. It is for the kid who typically posts about Nintendo games and had no idea about what homeopathy is really about. It is for the lurkers who thinks “homeopathy” equates to “herbal”… and thinks that just because someone can get a “PhD” relating to the nonsense that it must be real. Nope.

            (seriously, check out the comment history of the guy who I replied to with the “Naturally Cheap” homeopathy recipe, I suspect he is still in high school)

          • Simba

            Argh. Was looking at a textbook recently that mentioned ‘homeopathic treatments like tea tree oil’.

          • Chris

            Hmmmm. does oil mix with water… or alcohol, or even sugar pills? Obviously the authors of that textbook do not understand the actual nature of homeopathy.

            I know my “recipe” will not affect the beliefs of the true believers, I just hope it brings light to those you think it is the same thing as “herbal” medicine. Mostly because I have gotten interesting reactions of indignation and being told I was ignorant by the true believers.

          • Simba

            I think if homeopathy had truthful labelling, many people who currently buy it wouldn’t. They buy it because they don’t know what it actually is.

          • Chris

            I think the potency should be given in just a percentage. One where instead of 30C, it would be 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001%.

            I’d like to see the close to 400 zeros for 200C wrap around those tiny bottles!

          • shay simmons

            does oil mix with water

            Only in piecrust.

          • FallsAngel

            Some salad dressings too! Oil and vinegar, with vinegar being mostly water. Just being a brat here!

          • Chris

            But without an emulsifier like mustard or egg, they will separate.

            I’m being brat too! ;p

          • shay simmons

            At some point why does every discussion on disqus wind up being about recipes?

          • FallsAngel

            ‘Cuz we like to cook?

          • Chris

            Not really a liquid. First you cut the butter/lard/shortening into the flour, and then add water.

            Which I have to do today, since last Thanksgiving I made enough pumpkin filling for a 9″ pan, but only used half of it for a small pie. Well I just pulled the remainder filling from the freezer, and will make another crust to bake a little pie for pi day. 😉

          • shay simmons

            ECKSHUALLY…I have a piecrust recipe from my grandmother that uses cooking oil (raised three kids during the Depression. Butter was expensive). I have never tried it but supposedly it was a perfectly acceptable substitute.

            You are prompting me to dig out a bag of the peaches we froze to make the spousal unit a pie for dinner. We had to have one of our dogs euthanized yesterday and he is grieving.

          • Chris

            Goes to still open cookbook, on next page is the oil pastry recipe. You still mix the oil with the flour before, it makes little oil globules, then add liquid. I remember vaguely making one as a kid, and not really liking it.

            (we have the depression era mix in the pan cocoa cake that uses oil, it is a fairly common recipe… except ours has an egg in it because there were always a few chickens wandering around the orchards)

            I am so sorry about your dog. I have been sending money to poverty stricken soon to be grad student child because she had to take her cat to the vet three times in the last couple of weeks. I really hope that cat gets better, she is kind of the emotional support for someone who has moved away from home for the first time.

          • shay simmons

            I still use the recipe for “War Cake” with no eggs or milk in it. A little heavy, but not bad. Doesn’t keep well.

          • Chris

            Ours also does not have milk. There is a little bit of vinegar.

          • shay simmons

            I’m primarily a cat person, so I can understand this (the surviving dog is off-stage, probably plotting something.

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/256ad6a23108ca2feefc234d42d70c30594686a07cb4f1ae8fc1e839799fd709.jpg

          • FallsAngel

            Oh, no! So sorry to hear that about your dog! Peace.

          • Jewels

            I was unable to reply, having only seen it today for some reason, but thank you for the cross stitch pattern. It’s perfect!

            And I’m very sorry about your doggie. It’s so rough to have to do, and I sympathize whole-heartedly. We just had one of ours fixed today – my five year old, 7lb chihuahua mix. She’s currently asleep on my bed, having spent the entire afternoon and evening on my lap or in my arms, very groggy and confused.

            We also found out this morning that our eight year old 15lb terrier mix is severely diabetic. We brought him right in, suspecting what was wrong, so he has no kidney damage or loss of sight, but his blood sugar is over 600. (!!!) So those could still happen, as getting that down to a safe level may not be easy. The vet put him straight on insulin, but it’s just incredibly scary – I’m so afraid we’ll have to put him down if we can’t get it under control.

          • Windriven

            Why would CDC fund such a study?

            NCCIH would be the obvious funder as they will fund nearly any nonsensical study. But even NCCIH swore off homeopathy a few years back – proof that Josephine Brooks isn’t quite as stupid as she appears.

          • Chris

            I just hope the FTC will finally convince the leeway pushed through by Copeland a century ago will finally be abandoned by the FDA.

          • Windriven

            Amen!

          • There are modern recorded cases of people who were infected by rabies who were cured by homeopathy

            You have a reliable citation for that, yes? Linkage?

          • Chris

            Don’t hold your breath!

        • Are you also aware that not only can homeopathic dilutions can be tested and identified by the original substance, they can also identify different potencies?

          If this is true at all, all it is is a win for science. A demonstration that we are getting better at measuring things we couldn’t previously measure.

          Still doesn’t prove homeopathy works. This is another thing that has been established by science…

  • Dr Manhattan

    Edward Jenner purchased his medical degree, but that doesn’t stop modern medicine from following that fool.

    • He purchased his medical degree? Got a source on that one? The story I’m seeing is that he was apprenticed to a surgeon for years and later got an MD from the University of St. Andrew.

      • Dr Manhattan

        Editorial in “Truth” for January 10, 1923

        In his article “The Fraud of Vaccination,” published last week in Truth, Dr. Hadwen made some remarks not altogether complimentary to the discoverer of time reputed prophylactic against smallpox. These remarks led one reader to denounce both Dr. Hadwen and myself— Dr. Hadwen for libeling one of the greatest benefactors of humanity, and myself for propagating the libel. Dr. Hadwen is well able to take care of himself. For my own part, not wishing to do any injustice to the name and fame of the late Dr. Jenner, I asked Dr. Hadwen what he had against him, and he replied by sending me a pamphlet he has written on the subject. This I have compared with the account of Jenner’s life given in the _Dictionary of National Biography_, and the result is so illuminating that I will now give the salient facts as briefly as possible.

        To begin with, it is clear that Jenner never possessed anything that would be recognised to-day as a medical qualification. At the age of 16 he was apprenticed to a country surgeon and apothecary, and at 21 he was sent for two years as a pupil to Dr. John Hunter, of London, who undoubtedly was the most eminent surgeon of his day, and, like Jenner himself, a keen naturalist. At 23 Jenner returned to his native village and started to practise as surgeon and apothecary. Here he remained for 17 years, just a plain unqualified country surgeon and apothecary, unknown to the world at large, but keeping up a correspondence with Hunter on a variety of natural history subjects. At the end of this period he made his first bid for fame. In 1787 he sent a paper on “The Natural History of the Cuckoo” to the Royal Society, and, as a result, with Hunter’s influence, he was elected F.R.S. The paper contained a number of commonplace facts and some others, which Jenner stated to be from his own observation. The latter turned out to be purely imaginary, Jenner having accepted the report of a youthful nephew on the incidents he described. The coveted fellowship, therefore, appears to have been obtained by something very nearly approaching fraud. Three years later he applied to St. Andrew’s University for an M.D., and as St. Andrew’s in those days was no more squeamish about granting degrees than some of the so-called American Universities are to-day, so long as the fees are forthcoming, Jenner became Dr. Jenner for the modest outlay of £15. Later on in life, after several applications, he was also granted an M.D. by the University of Oxford, though this was not until after his discovery had been generally adopted.

        • Thanks! I’m pretty skeptical of Dr. Hadwen, but I appreciate the opportunity to see what he said.

          • Chris

            Why would it matter? Jenner had no relationship with Hahnemann, so how he got his degree over two centuries is irrelevant to the efficacy of homeopathy.

            Claiming something about the history of real medicine will not prove homeopathy works. The only way to prove homeopathy works is proving good scientific evidence that it works for a non-self-limiting condition, like rabies. If you read what Saine claimed in this debate, you will see even promoters of the nonsense asked why this was not tested in animals.

          • It doesn’t, but I was curious.

          • Dr Manhattan

            One cannot prove a negative.

  • Joanne Cooper

    Why is there no homeopathic birth control?