Apple teams up with Organ Donors of America

Apple teams up with Organ Donors of America

 

Apple announced today they will be embarking on a new partnership with Organ Donors of America to promote and advocate for organ donation. The team at Organ Donors of America reached out to Apple with an ingenious idea to get more people to sign up to be organ donors.

“We asked them how many people do they think actually read the terms and conditions they agree to when using iTunes? Their response was 0%,” explained Richard Derrens, CEO of Organ Donors of America. “So we asked them if they would mind adding a little something into it for us.”

The new terms and conditions for Apple’s latest version of iTunes are over 50 pages long, and this is how it looks now:

Association of Associated Devices is subject to the following terms:

(i) You may auto-download iTunes Eligible Content or download previously-acquired iTunes Eligible Content from an Account on up to 10 Associated Devices, provided no more than 5 are iTunes-authorized computers.

(ii) An Associated Device can be associated with only one Account at any given time.

(iii) You may switch an Associated Device to a different Account only once every 90 days.

(iv) Users are now registered organ donors with Organ Donors of America.

(v) You may download previously-acquired free content onto an unlimited number of devices while it is free on the iTunes Service, but on no more than 5 iTunes-authorized computers.

An Apple TV is not an “Associated Device.” However, TV show iTunes Products and purchased (i.e. not rented) movies iTunes Products may be played back on compatible Apple TVs, provided that you may only play back any such TV show or movie on a limited number of Apple TVs at the same time.

Some pieces of iTunes Eligible Content may be large, and significant data charges may result from delivery of such iTunes Eligible Content over a data connection.

Apple is expecting some backlash from this endeavor but feel confident that this slight bend in the rules will not lead to anything serious; other than perhaps a few YouTube videos or Twitter trends. “What’s a little bending of the rules in the grand scheme of things? It’s not like people care if the latest Apple products might be bending something,” says an Apple employee who wishes to remain nameless.